Explore - Page 3

Introduction to Watch Materials: Steel And Gold

The most common and popular material in watchmaking is 316L Stainless Steel, but that is not the only material that watches are made out of. Today you can find watches made out of gold, platinum, ceramic, carbon fiber, plastic, bronze and more...

Watch Styles: Dress Watches

If you want to get a good idea of what the modern watchmaking industry regards as a dress watch, you have to look back in time to the classic, thin watches that used to be worn by many. Common features include a small (by modern standards), gold (or gold-toned) watch, with a classical typeface (either Roman numerals or an elegant Arabic script) or baton markers, set against a plain dial background.

Watch features: Day and Day/Date Function

One of the oldest and most established complications in wristwatch design is the humble date window. Although we often take this innocuous feature for granted, it wasn't until 1945 that the immediate jumping date to which we've become accustomed first appeared. The very first model to feature this c...

Watch Styles: Sports Watches

In 2019, Odell Beckham Junior stepped onto the field in Week 1 of the NFL football season with a 350k Richard Mille strapped to his wrist. He wasn't alone. Tennis star Rafael Nadal powered his way to a 19th Grand Slam title while sporting the same brand. On the greatest stage, under the brightest li...

A Beginner's Guide To Watch Features

Here is a quick guide to getting up and running with the world of watches. Here is a great place to start if you are just getting your wrists wet with some timepiece research .

Watch Features: Perpetual Calendar

Of all the complications in the world of watchmaking, few have the glory and prestige of a true perpetual calendar. Regarded as one of the most challenging complications to design, assemble, and service, a good perpetual calendar's functionality will outlive that of its original owner quite comforta...

Movements: Quartz

Most people have heard of a quartz watch, but few fully understand what the designation means. The name refers to an actual quartz crystal that is sitting inside their watch, with the unique crystalline structure of the stone acting as the perfect material for the piezoelectric oscillator in wristwatches. Initially, this technology was not widely adopted. It was not until many years later when the cost of quartz became commercially viable.

Watch features: Power Reserve

A common - and very helpful - complication one might find on a mechanical timepiece is a power reserve indicator. As its name suggests, a power reserve indicator acts as a fuel gauge, informing the wearer of how many hours of run time the movement has left in it before it will need winding again. Ov...

Watch Styles: Dive Watches

The dive watch segment is perhaps one of the most crowded and competitive in the watch industry. But how did these serious tools that play a significant role in keeping recreational and commercial divers safe become such a voluminous segment of the watch market? As watchmaking took strides to redefi...

Watch Styles: Racing Chronographs

Racing chronographs make up a very specific, but highly popular niche of watchmaking. In fact, as a testament to their popularity, the most expensive wristwatch ever sold - at a price tag of $17,750,000 - is a racing chronograph. But before we discuss the remarkable story of that particular watch, l...